Google’s Stadia service comes with bandwidth consumption requirements that could put a serious strain on 1TB data caps across the country. 4K isn’t going to be accessible to a lot of folks — not without overage fees.

New York State and Charter Communication have announced a settlement to their fraud case that will see the ISP pay $174M for various fraudulent, misleading, and consumer-hostile actions it took against its users.

5G service could collapse the distinction between cellular provider and ISP, fundamentally changing how consumers buy internet service — but only if that service is kept affordable.

New York State has thrown Charter (doing business as Spectrum) out of the state after its failure to live up to its merger agreement.

Charter has announced that it will bring gigabit service to millions more homes this year, including four million over the summer.

Charter has appealed a court decision ruling that it could face lawsuits over its deceptive marketing and fraudulent business practices.

Wireless spectrum in the US is carefully regulated to avoid interference, which is why mobile carriers pay out the nose to license slices of the airwaves. Naturally, T-Mobile was quite perturbed recently when it detected heavy interference with its network in Brooklyn.

Verizon has announced that it will begin locking phones again, at least until they’re activated. Verizon says this is to combat device theft, but it seems like Verizon just wants an excuse to lock its phones down again.

New York State and Montana don’t normally team up, but politics makes for strange bedfellows. Montana and NYS became the first two states to order that all ISPs wishing to do business with the state government must uphold net neutrality principles as a condition of any state contract.

Ajit Pai has released an updated draft report ahead of the FCC’s February meeting, indicating the government body won’t try to redefine mobile and fixed broadband as essentially equivalent.