GameStop’s stock has fallen by 40 percent this week after its Q1 earnings call. Investors were not satisfied with the company’s financials or its plans for recovery.

GameStop has confirmed that it’s exploring options for a private equity buyout after a bruising six months in 2018. But any such deal could also transform the larger console space.

GameStop’s new PowerPass program gives gamers the option to play as many used games as they want and keep two per year, at $60 per six months ($120 per year).

Since the Xbox One and its draconian always-online and used games DRM policies were initially revealed, Microsoft has been taking a constant beating from the consumer public. Now, it seems a persistent stream of vitriol has changed Microsoft’s mind, and the company is retracting the offending policies.

Whereas rumors once swirled that Microsoft’s Xbox One would require a true always-on connection — one that required the Xbox One to be online literally all the time — the policy turned out to be a simple check-in once every 24 hours. However, a common argument against an always-online Xbox is that some people just can’t afford an Xbox and an internet service, but no one ever seems to go out and do the math to see if this is true.

In recent memory, rumors have surfaced that suggest the next Xbox, whether it be called the Xbox 720, Durango, or something else entirely, will be a console that is always connected to the internet. This unfortunate notion is commonly referred to as always-on DRM, usually requiring consumers to be online in order to access their software. A new leak is corroborating the always-on rumor, as well as suggesting that the Xbox 720 will require all games to be installed to the hard drive.